Around the South Pacific Division

South Pacific Division joined partners from The Port of San Francisco at the historic Ferry Building Jan. 26, to announce release of the draft San Francisco Waterfront Coastal Flood Feasibility Study for a 60-day review and public comment. SPD...
Leaders from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers San Francisco District and East Bay Municipal Utility District signed a milestone project partnership agreement Jan. 26, 2024, paving the way for construction of the first recycled water pipeline to...
Danny Baldwin, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contractor, checks a dozer arm for proper operation at Folsom Dam Dike 1 in Granite Bay, California, November 15, 2023. The USACE Sacramento District is raising the dike up to 3.5 feet in accordance with...
Doug Chitwood, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District lead project engineer, left of center, talks with Col. James Handura, commander of the Corps’ South Pacific Division, right, during a site tour Jan. 18 on the Rio Hondo side of...
Three eagles perched in a tree are seen through a telescope at John Martin Reservoir, Colo., during the annual mid-winter bald eagle survey there, Jan. 12, 2024.

South Pacific Division District Links

District MapDistrict list

South Pacific Division News

Final: Navigable Waters Protection Rule

Los Angeles District
Published Jan. 24, 2020
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Deputy Commander Col. Daryll Fust speaks to community members and the media about the USACE role in the Navigable Waters Protection Rule Jan. 23. Fust joined EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker and Rep. Paul Gosar. The event was hosted by Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Director Misael Cabrera.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Deputy Commander Col. Daryll Fust speaks to community members and the media about the USACE role in the Navigable Waters Protection Rule Jan. 23. Fust joined EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker and Rep. Paul Gosar. The event was hosted by Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Director Misael Cabrera.

PHOENIX — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army released the Navigable Waters Protection Rule Jan. 23. The rule provides a new and final definition for Waters of the United States.

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Director Misael Cabrera hosted EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Deputy Commander Col. Daryll Fust and Rep. Paul Gosar.

"With the Navigable Waters Protection Rule, we are bringing clarity once and for all to American farmers, landowners and businesses," Stoker said. "We are rebalancing the relationship between the federal government and the states and tribes in managing land and water resources by outlining an approach that together with existing state and tribal regulations and local land use programs provide a network of coverage for our nation's water resources as called for in the Clean Water Act."

The mission of the USACE Regulatory Program is to protect the nation’s aquatic resources and navigable capacity while allowing economic development through fair and balanced decisions.

"As with previous policy changes, our team will work closely with stakeholders," Fust said. "There is much to do with our EPA counterparts, states, local governments, industry partners and organizations,  tribes, and the general public to educate and inform them about the implementation of this new rule."

The revised definition identifies four clear categories of waters that are federally regulated under the Clean Water Act: the territorial seas and traditional navigable waters; perennial and intermittent tributaries to those waters; certain lakes, ponds, and impoundments; and wetlands adjacent to jurisdictional waters.

"The final rule also details what is not waters of the United States," Stoker said. "Features that only contain water in direct response to rainfall; ground water; ditches including most farm ditches; farm and stock watering ponds; waste treatment systems and prior converted crop land."

For more on the Navigable Waters Protection Rule visit www.epa.gov/nwpr.


  • Facebook
  • X

News Releases

Final: Navigable Waters Protection Rule

Los Angeles District
Published Jan. 24, 2020
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Deputy Commander Col. Daryll Fust speaks to community members and the media about the USACE role in the Navigable Waters Protection Rule Jan. 23. Fust joined EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker and Rep. Paul Gosar. The event was hosted by Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Director Misael Cabrera.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Deputy Commander Col. Daryll Fust speaks to community members and the media about the USACE role in the Navigable Waters Protection Rule Jan. 23. Fust joined EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker and Rep. Paul Gosar. The event was hosted by Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Director Misael Cabrera.

PHOENIX — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army released the Navigable Waters Protection Rule Jan. 23. The rule provides a new and final definition for Waters of the United States.

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Director Misael Cabrera hosted EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Administrator Mike Stoker, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Deputy Commander Col. Daryll Fust and Rep. Paul Gosar.

"With the Navigable Waters Protection Rule, we are bringing clarity once and for all to American farmers, landowners and businesses," Stoker said. "We are rebalancing the relationship between the federal government and the states and tribes in managing land and water resources by outlining an approach that together with existing state and tribal regulations and local land use programs provide a network of coverage for our nation's water resources as called for in the Clean Water Act."

The mission of the USACE Regulatory Program is to protect the nation’s aquatic resources and navigable capacity while allowing economic development through fair and balanced decisions.

"As with previous policy changes, our team will work closely with stakeholders," Fust said. "There is much to do with our EPA counterparts, states, local governments, industry partners and organizations,  tribes, and the general public to educate and inform them about the implementation of this new rule."

The revised definition identifies four clear categories of waters that are federally regulated under the Clean Water Act: the territorial seas and traditional navigable waters; perennial and intermittent tributaries to those waters; certain lakes, ponds, and impoundments; and wetlands adjacent to jurisdictional waters.

"The final rule also details what is not waters of the United States," Stoker said. "Features that only contain water in direct response to rainfall; ground water; ditches including most farm ditches; farm and stock watering ponds; waste treatment systems and prior converted crop land."

For more on the Navigable Waters Protection Rule visit www.epa.gov/nwpr.