Around the South Pacific Division

USACE is sharing flood inundation maps for its dams in the National Inventory of Dams as well as narrative summaries about what our dams do, benefits they provide and risks they pose, and planned and ongoing actions to manage dam risks.
Work being done on Isabella Dam
The Los Angeles District is responsible for 14 harbors along the Southern California coast stretching from San Diego Harbor near the Mexican border to Morro Bay Harbor on California's central coast.
The Humboldt Jetty project consists of repairs to the North and South Jetties that maintain the opening and the federal navigation channel into Humboldt Bay.
The Petaluma River is located on San Pablo Bay in Sonoma and Marin Counties, California. Operations and Maintenance (O&M) provides for dredging of a channel 200 feet wide to a depth of -8 feet Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) across the flats in San...

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Corps river and creek cleanup project removes 575 tons of debris

Los Angeles District
Published Oct. 27, 2021
Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless encampment, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleared during the project.

Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless encampment, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleared during the project.

Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless campsite, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleaned, removing a whopping 575 tons of debris during the project.

Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless campsite, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleaned, removing a whopping 575 tons of debris during the project.

A contracted worker contemplates how best to remove a fence of giant reeds (Arundo donax) from an abandoned campsite. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and the San Gabriel River, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a cleanup project.

A contracted worker contemplates how best to remove a fence of giant reeds (Arundo donax) from an abandoned campsite. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and the San Gabriel River, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a cleanup project.

Notices like this one are posted in the affected cleanup zone two weeks before work began. During the 14-day interim, LA County social services and the VA swept the 120 acres, offering services to the unhoused. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

Notices like this one are posted in the affected cleanup zone two weeks before work began. During the 14-day interim, LA County social services and the VA swept the 120 acres, offering services to the unhoused. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

In a section of river at the confluence of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel river not disturbed by illegal camping, the natural beauty of the land managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District is revealed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

In a section of river at the confluence of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel river not disturbed by illegal camping, the natural beauty of the land managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District is revealed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

Birds and other wildlife depend on the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek for nesting. These feathered friends stand on a cement fall in a section of the river between levees. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a massive cleanup project.

Birds and other wildlife depend on the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek for nesting. These feathered friends stand on a cement fall in a section of the river between levees. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a massive cleanup project.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Ranger Annel Monsalvo documents a debris field as LA County Sheriff deputies sweep the 120 acres of riverbank to be cleaned up. The Corps Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Ranger Annel Monsalvo documents a debris field as LA County Sheriff deputies sweep the 120 acres of riverbank to be cleaned up. The Corps Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District project manager Trevor Snyder, foreground, briefs an early morning assembly of law enforcement, social services and community partners before the start of the two-week project, Sept. 27, in Whittier, California. The Corps cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District project manager Trevor Snyder, foreground, briefs an early morning assembly of law enforcement, social services and community partners before the start of the two-week project, Sept. 27, in Whittier, California. The Corps cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.

A worker carries a bundle of Arundo donax, an invasive giant reed that can grow a foot or more daily. Arundo was used in the encampments as a construction material for makeshift fencing and huts. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel riverbanks.

A worker carries a bundle of Arundo donax, an invasive giant reed that can grow a foot or more daily. Arundo was used in the encampments as a construction material for makeshift fencing and huts. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel riverbanks.

Workers queue-up to dump car seats and other debris found used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup into one of 82 dumpsters, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 12

Workers queue-up to dump car seats and other debris found used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup into one of 82 dumpsters, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.

A steady stream of contracted workers fills one of 82 dumpsters used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 12

A steady stream of contracted workers fills one of 82 dumpsters used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

An abandoned Arundo donax hut partially hidden on the wooded bank is revealed as contracted workers removed tons of trash from San Jose Creek. Arundo is an invasive giant reed that grows very fast. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared 575 tons of debris from about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 12

An abandoned Arundo donax hut partially hidden on the wooded bank is revealed as contracted workers removed tons of trash from San Jose Creek. Arundo is an invasive giant reed that grows very fast. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared 575 tons of debris from about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

After months of planning and coordinating with local partners and four weeks of hard work, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District completed a project cleaning homeless encampment debris from the banks of the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek near Whittier Narrows Dam, Oct. 22, in the San Gabriel Valley, California.

“This debris cleanup was imperative to the upcoming multi-year sediment and vegetation removal at the confluence of San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek,” said Lt. Col. Malia Pearson, program manager.

Setting up the project to remove so much trash from such a large area at the convergence of creek and river began last spring. Before the project could begin, the District Operations Division partnered with multiple city and county agencies, including neighborhood organizations. Signage advising the cleanup was coming was posted Sept. 13, and LA county social services and Veterans Affairs combed the wooded banks, offering assistance to those found camping on the Corps managed land.

Pearson said the cleanup was necessary as preparation for a future levee repair project that could begin in 2024, depending on funding.

“This levee repair project will address the safety concerns for the city of South El Monte and especially the neighborhood behind the western levee should the levee fail,” Pearson explained, noting the western levee has been eroded due to the impingement caused by the sediment at the confluence.

Living in a riverbed is always a dangerous risk, Pearson added, noting the campsites were within the boundaries of the levees.

“The occurrence of flash flooding with the LA basin is always a potential concern,” she said. “Should flooding occur, these individuals would be in grave danger. For their safety, we worked closely with law enforcement and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to find safer accommodations.”

Work began daybreak on Sept. 27 in San Jose Creek. Contractors hauled trash, shopping carts, bundles of Arundo donax reeds used to build campsites, abandoned vehicles, propane tanks and gasoline cans from abandoned illegal campsites. Scores of big dumpsters were filled and refilled until the last semi pulled away.

“A total of 82 40-cubic-yard dumpsters were filled, removing 575 tons of trash and debris in the San Jose Creek and San Gabriel River,” said Corps project manager Trevor Snyder. Snyder was responsible for the collaboration effort with partner agencies such as LAHSA, LA County Department of Mental Health, the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and more. “A massive undertaking.”

About 120 acres of riverbank northeast of the interchange of Interstate 605 and State Route 60 were cleaned of debris during the four-week project.

An adjacent stretch of land along the San Gabriel managed by the LA District was cleaned up about a year ago. The Corps maintains more than 50 miles of channels and levees within the San Gabriel, Los Angeles and Rio Hondo rivers, and Compton and Ballona creeks.


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Corps river and creek cleanup project removes 575 tons of debris

Los Angeles District
Published Oct. 27, 2021
Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless encampment, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleared during the project.

Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless encampment, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleared during the project.

Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless campsite, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleaned, removing a whopping 575 tons of debris during the project.

Workers remove trash from an abandoned homeless campsite, Sept. 27, 2021, near Whittier, California, as part of a two-week cleanup by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District. About 120 acres of creek and riverbank were cleaned, removing a whopping 575 tons of debris during the project.

A contracted worker contemplates how best to remove a fence of giant reeds (Arundo donax) from an abandoned campsite. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and the San Gabriel River, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a cleanup project.

A contracted worker contemplates how best to remove a fence of giant reeds (Arundo donax) from an abandoned campsite. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and the San Gabriel River, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a cleanup project.

Notices like this one are posted in the affected cleanup zone two weeks before work began. During the 14-day interim, LA County social services and the VA swept the 120 acres, offering services to the unhoused. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

Notices like this one are posted in the affected cleanup zone two weeks before work began. During the 14-day interim, LA County social services and the VA swept the 120 acres, offering services to the unhoused. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

In a section of river at the confluence of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel river not disturbed by illegal camping, the natural beauty of the land managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District is revealed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

In a section of river at the confluence of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel river not disturbed by illegal camping, the natural beauty of the land managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District is revealed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of creek and riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in an ambitious cleanup project.

Birds and other wildlife depend on the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek for nesting. These feathered friends stand on a cement fall in a section of the river between levees. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a massive cleanup project.

Birds and other wildlife depend on the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek for nesting. These feathered friends stand on a cement fall in a section of the river between levees. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021, in a massive cleanup project.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Ranger Annel Monsalvo documents a debris field as LA County Sheriff deputies sweep the 120 acres of riverbank to be cleaned up. The Corps Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Ranger Annel Monsalvo documents a debris field as LA County Sheriff deputies sweep the 120 acres of riverbank to be cleaned up. The Corps Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District project manager Trevor Snyder, foreground, briefs an early morning assembly of law enforcement, social services and community partners before the start of the two-week project, Sept. 27, in Whittier, California. The Corps cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District project manager Trevor Snyder, foreground, briefs an early morning assembly of law enforcement, social services and community partners before the start of the two-week project, Sept. 27, in Whittier, California. The Corps cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.

A worker carries a bundle of Arundo donax, an invasive giant reed that can grow a foot or more daily. Arundo was used in the encampments as a construction material for makeshift fencing and huts. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel riverbanks.

A worker carries a bundle of Arundo donax, an invasive giant reed that can grow a foot or more daily. Arundo was used in the encampments as a construction material for makeshift fencing and huts. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of San Jose Creek and San Gabriel riverbanks.

Workers queue-up to dump car seats and other debris found used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup into one of 82 dumpsters, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 12

Workers queue-up to dump car seats and other debris found used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup into one of 82 dumpsters, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank.

A steady stream of contracted workers fills one of 82 dumpsters used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 12

A steady stream of contracted workers fills one of 82 dumpsters used during the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek cleanup. A total of 575 tons of debris were removed during the two-week project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

An abandoned Arundo donax hut partially hidden on the wooded bank is revealed as contracted workers removed tons of trash from San Jose Creek. Arundo is an invasive giant reed that grows very fast. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared 575 tons of debris from about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 12

An abandoned Arundo donax hut partially hidden on the wooded bank is revealed as contracted workers removed tons of trash from San Jose Creek. Arundo is an invasive giant reed that grows very fast. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District cleared 575 tons of debris from about 120 acres of riverbank, Sept. 27-Oct. 22, 2021.

After months of planning and coordinating with local partners and four weeks of hard work, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District completed a project cleaning homeless encampment debris from the banks of the San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek near Whittier Narrows Dam, Oct. 22, in the San Gabriel Valley, California.

“This debris cleanup was imperative to the upcoming multi-year sediment and vegetation removal at the confluence of San Gabriel River and San Jose Creek,” said Lt. Col. Malia Pearson, program manager.

Setting up the project to remove so much trash from such a large area at the convergence of creek and river began last spring. Before the project could begin, the District Operations Division partnered with multiple city and county agencies, including neighborhood organizations. Signage advising the cleanup was coming was posted Sept. 13, and LA county social services and Veterans Affairs combed the wooded banks, offering assistance to those found camping on the Corps managed land.

Pearson said the cleanup was necessary as preparation for a future levee repair project that could begin in 2024, depending on funding.

“This levee repair project will address the safety concerns for the city of South El Monte and especially the neighborhood behind the western levee should the levee fail,” Pearson explained, noting the western levee has been eroded due to the impingement caused by the sediment at the confluence.

Living in a riverbed is always a dangerous risk, Pearson added, noting the campsites were within the boundaries of the levees.

“The occurrence of flash flooding with the LA basin is always a potential concern,” she said. “Should flooding occur, these individuals would be in grave danger. For their safety, we worked closely with law enforcement and the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) to find safer accommodations.”

Work began daybreak on Sept. 27 in San Jose Creek. Contractors hauled trash, shopping carts, bundles of Arundo donax reeds used to build campsites, abandoned vehicles, propane tanks and gasoline cans from abandoned illegal campsites. Scores of big dumpsters were filled and refilled until the last semi pulled away.

“A total of 82 40-cubic-yard dumpsters were filled, removing 575 tons of trash and debris in the San Jose Creek and San Gabriel River,” said Corps project manager Trevor Snyder. Snyder was responsible for the collaboration effort with partner agencies such as LAHSA, LA County Department of Mental Health, the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and more. “A massive undertaking.”

About 120 acres of riverbank northeast of the interchange of Interstate 605 and State Route 60 were cleaned of debris during the four-week project.

An adjacent stretch of land along the San Gabriel managed by the LA District was cleaned up about a year ago. The Corps maintains more than 50 miles of channels and levees within the San Gabriel, Los Angeles and Rio Hondo rivers, and Compton and Ballona creeks.