Around the South Pacific Division

USACE is sharing flood inundation maps for its dams in the National Inventory of Dams as well as narrative summaries about what our dams do, benefits they provide and risks they pose, and planned and ongoing actions to manage dam risks.
Work being done on Isabella Dam
The Los Angeles District is responsible for 14 harbors along the Southern California coast stretching from San Diego Harbor near the Mexican border to Morro Bay Harbor on California's central coast.
The Humboldt Jetty project consists of repairs to the North and South Jetties that maintain the opening and the federal navigation channel into Humboldt Bay.
The Petaluma River is located on San Pablo Bay in Sonoma and Marin Counties, California. Operations and Maintenance (O&M) provides for dredging of a channel 200 feet wide to a depth of -8 feet Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) across the flats in San...

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ERDC delivers augmented reality solutions in the fight against COVID-19

Published May 5, 2020
Kelly Irvin of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center uses augmented reality technology developed in the Information Technology Laboratory to inspect a mock boiler room. The software is being used across the nation to assess potential sites for COVID-19 alternate care facilities, while limiting the number of people who have to physically examine the facilities.

Kelly Irvin of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center uses augmented reality technology developed in the Information Technology Laboratory to inspect a mock boiler room. The software is being used across the nation to assess potential sites for COVID-19 alternate care facilities, while limiting the number of people who have to physically examine the facilities.

Caleb Willard, an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District, uses augmented reality tools developed at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess a potential site for a COVID-19 alternate care facility from home.

Caleb Willard, an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District, uses augmented reality tools developed at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess a potential site for a COVID-19 alternate care facility from home.

VICKSBURG, Miss – Scientists and engineers at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) are using augmented reality technology to assist peers throughout the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in virtually conducting site assessments of alternate care facilities (ACFs) across the country.

Augmented reality technology, developed by researchers at the ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL), offers a way for the USACE to assess potential ACF locations while assisting with social distancing and safety considerations.  

“The ERDC team is forward thinking in terms of how immersive computing can be applied to solve real-world engineering science and defense-related challenges,” said Jonathan Boone, an ITL research civil engineer.

Using live-streaming and mixed-reality overlays, smaller groups of engineers located on-site have the capability to share information with subject-matter experts working remotely. In addition to the safety benefits of leveraging the technology, real-time collaboration of assessment results has expedited the  delivery of information to FEMA.

Currently five USACE districts are prototyping the technology, with two more districts planning to use the technology soon.

“Facility assessments are critical to the success of the ACF mission,” Boone said. “Having reachback, live-stream capabilities allows engineers and architects who are leading efforts from a ‘boots on the ground’ team perspective to get virtual support from other USACE subject-matter experts.”

Using augmented reality for ACF assessments is just one way that the ITL team has and continues to identify ways to use innovative technology to address real-world challenges. “Innovate, immerse and inspire” is the mission of the ERDC team members delivering solutions with augmented reality technologies.

“Augmented and virtual reality is the connective tissue for all things the ERDC is doing with artificial intelligence and robotics to leverage more informed decision-making for the nation and the warfighter,” Boone said. “In a virtual world, our stakeholders can practice, fail, learn and improve through repetition in a safe environment. That way, they’ll be better suited to perform their duties.”


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ERDC delivers augmented reality solutions in the fight against COVID-19

Published May 5, 2020
Kelly Irvin of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center uses augmented reality technology developed in the Information Technology Laboratory to inspect a mock boiler room. The software is being used across the nation to assess potential sites for COVID-19 alternate care facilities, while limiting the number of people who have to physically examine the facilities.

Kelly Irvin of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center uses augmented reality technology developed in the Information Technology Laboratory to inspect a mock boiler room. The software is being used across the nation to assess potential sites for COVID-19 alternate care facilities, while limiting the number of people who have to physically examine the facilities.

Caleb Willard, an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District, uses augmented reality tools developed at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess a potential site for a COVID-19 alternate care facility from home.

Caleb Willard, an engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Walla Walla District, uses augmented reality tools developed at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center to assess a potential site for a COVID-19 alternate care facility from home.

VICKSBURG, Miss – Scientists and engineers at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) are using augmented reality technology to assist peers throughout the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in virtually conducting site assessments of alternate care facilities (ACFs) across the country.

Augmented reality technology, developed by researchers at the ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL), offers a way for the USACE to assess potential ACF locations while assisting with social distancing and safety considerations.  

“The ERDC team is forward thinking in terms of how immersive computing can be applied to solve real-world engineering science and defense-related challenges,” said Jonathan Boone, an ITL research civil engineer.

Using live-streaming and mixed-reality overlays, smaller groups of engineers located on-site have the capability to share information with subject-matter experts working remotely. In addition to the safety benefits of leveraging the technology, real-time collaboration of assessment results has expedited the  delivery of information to FEMA.

Currently five USACE districts are prototyping the technology, with two more districts planning to use the technology soon.

“Facility assessments are critical to the success of the ACF mission,” Boone said. “Having reachback, live-stream capabilities allows engineers and architects who are leading efforts from a ‘boots on the ground’ team perspective to get virtual support from other USACE subject-matter experts.”

Using augmented reality for ACF assessments is just one way that the ITL team has and continues to identify ways to use innovative technology to address real-world challenges. “Innovate, immerse and inspire” is the mission of the ERDC team members delivering solutions with augmented reality technologies.

“Augmented and virtual reality is the connective tissue for all things the ERDC is doing with artificial intelligence and robotics to leverage more informed decision-making for the nation and the warfighter,” Boone said. “In a virtual world, our stakeholders can practice, fail, learn and improve through repetition in a safe environment. That way, they’ll be better suited to perform their duties.”